Showing posts with label - - Legends - -. Show all posts
Showing posts with label - - Legends - -. Show all posts

6/08/2017

Fudo Myo-O and Oni

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Fudo Myo-O 不動明王と鬼伝説 Oni Demon Legends and Fudo

. 不動明王 Fudo Myo-O - Acala - Vidyaraja .
- Introduction -

jaki o fumu Fudo Myo-O 邪鬼を踏む不動明王
Fudo Myo-O stepping on a Jaki demon





- The complete scroll is here :
- source : yahoo auctions June 2017 -

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. Japanese Legends - 伝説 民話 昔話 – ABC-List .

............................................................................ Aichi 愛知県
名古屋市 Nagoya 熱田区 Atsuta

高蔵不動院 Takakura Fudo-In - O-Yakushi no Oni Matsuri 大薬師の鬼祭 Demon Festival
During the Shusho-E 修正会 rituals on the fifth day of the New Year at the Temple Takakura Fudo-In there is a ritual called
O-Yakushi no Oni Matsuri, "Festival of the Demons of Yakushi Nyorai". 12 men from nearby Atsuta, aged 25 and 42 are chosen to participate as Oni. On leap years there are 13 men.
The demon masks of the temple are made of strong thick paper and ward off evil influence for the coming year. The masks are imitations of the one's from the "Bull Festival of Kyoto" 京都牛祭 (太秦の牛祭).


............................................................................ Akita 秋田県
山本郡 Yamamoto district 二ツ井町 Futatsui Machi

鬼神集落 Onigami village
The protector deity of this village is called オボシナサマ Oboshina Sama (Fudo Myo-O).

Its festival is on the 28th day of the 3rd lunar month, now on May 8. On the evening before the festival people put their boiled vegetables in a Bento lunch box and meet at the shrine, to eat it all together. They are not allowed to eat any meat on this occasion.
Then in 1956 some brave one eat some meat and what do you say - the next day was a huge fire in the hamlet and 17 homes burned down.


............................................................................ Kyoto 京都府
加佐郡 Kasa district 大江町 Oe Machi

Shuten Dooji 酒呑童子 Shuten Doji / 不動堂 Fudo-Do Hall

Onigajaya, Oni-Ga-Chaya 鬼ヶ茶屋


- reference source : city.fukuchiyama.kyoto.jp/onihaku .. onityaya -

Near the place where the remains of the mansion of Shuten Doji are supposed to be there is a huge boulder. There is also a place where the river flows upstream when the demons wash the bloody robes; this is where the villagers later they build the 不動堂 Fudo Hall below the waterfall 千丈ヶ滝下 Senjogataki.
Even further up in the mountain, where Shuten Doji was defeated by Raiko Yorimitsu there is now the shrine
鬼獄神社 Onitake Jinja / 鬼嶽稲荷神社 Onitake Inari Jinja.
Raiko had prepared Shinben Kidokushu 神便鬼毒酒 a special rice wine with poison for the Oni and was thus able to kill it.

Oni-take Inari Jinja 京都府福知山市大江町北原 Fukuchiyama, Kyoto
. Shuten Dooji 酒呑童子 Shuten Doji "Sake Child" Demon .


Onitake-Inari Jinja Shrine at the 8th station of Mt.Oe. With a beautiful view of the sea of clouds in Autumn.


............................................................................ Miyagi 宮城県
玉造郡 Tamatsukuri district 鳴子町 Naruko

鬼首村 Onikobe village (Demon Head Village) 
Once upon a time
a demon wanted to enter the village of Onikobe, but Fudo killed him and burned the body.
From the ashes arose many many many mosquitoes which to our day suck the blood of the people.


............................................................................ Nara 奈良県
生駒市 Ikoma 鬼取町 Onitori Cho

En no Gyoja met a couple of Oni who were eating humans. He asked them not to do that any more but they did not listen to him. He hid in a cave but they wanted to give him human flesh to eat even there.
Then 不動明王 Fudo Myo-O comes along and pressured the couple not to eat humans any more. Now they promised to change their ways.
Zenki went to 洞川 Dorogawa (now a famous hot spring), and Goki went to 十津川 Totsukawa .

At 生駒山 Mount Ikomasan、En no Gyoja had a dream given to him by 孔雀明 Kujaku Myo-O.
He should capture the two Oni from the foot of Ikomasan and turn them into decent beings. He stayed in prayer for 21 days and on the last day, with 不動緊縛の法 Fudo Kinboku, a special ritual of Fudo Myo-O he could capture them.
So the Oni cut off their hair and became the pious disciples of En no Gyoja.

The mountain is now called Onitorisan 鬼取山 "Mountain of capturing the Demons",
and the village is still called that way, 鬼取 Onitori.

 . Zenki 前鬼 and his wife Goki 後鬼 .



............................................................................ Oita 大分県
直入郡 Naoiri district Yamaga

Fudo Iwa 不動岩 Fudo Rock
Once upon a time,
the bottom of the 阿蘇の盆地 Plain of Aso was a lake.
A demon tried to fill the lake with earch and carried earth to the place, but he broke the pole of his carrier. The earth fell down and this became 上萩岳 Upper Ogidake mountain and下萩岳 Lower Ogidake mountain.
The Demon became angry and pressed against the boulder 不動岩 Fudo-Iwa but could not move it. Since that time, there are the remains of the demon's head, back and both hands on the boulder.

. Oita 大分県の鬼伝説 Oni Demon Legends .



This formation was named in the Heian Period by a mountain ascetic who venerated Fudo Myo-O here. It has three Fudo Rocks, the front, middle and back Fudo. The highest Front Fudo, Mae Fudo 前不動 is 80 meters high and more than 100 meters in circumference.

There are three huge rocks on this hill in Yamaga city which are collectively called "Fudo Iwa" which means literally immovable rocks. These rocks are individually known as: Mae-Fudo, Naka-Fudo, and Ato-Fudo.
Mae-Fudo is the biggest one, and from here you have a great view of mountain and sunset.

There is a story about these rocks that once upon a time,
Fudo-Iwa and Hikodake (Mt. Hiko, located in Yamaga city) were step-brothers. Their mother always treated only Fudo-Iwa with affection because she gave birth to him, but treated the other Hikodake harshly.
One day,
the mother told them to try the pulling rope game with their neck. She said, I will give the family treasure of 3 balls handed down for long time to the winner. When they started the game, because he was always eating soft and tasty beans the head of Fudo-Iwa came off easily and fell into the Kubishi Pass where it remains turned into stone.
Now it is said
that the rest of the body of Fudo-Iwa is the Fudo Iwa at present. Because Hikodake was always eating hard beans, he grew so big and tough. There is a footpath around here to enjoy walking while looking at the seasonal flowers until you reach to the observatory.
. Fudoo Iwa 不動岩 Fudo Rocks - Introcuction .



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- reference : nichibun yokai database 妖怪データベース -

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不動明王の邪鬼退治図 Fudo driving out the Jaki


source : subarukouboushop.hamazo.tv


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. Onipedia - 鬼ペディア - Oni Demons - ABC-List - .

. Tengu 天狗と伝説 Tengu legends "Long-nosed Goblin" .

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

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5/12/2016

tsukimono bewitched

- yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters -
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- tsukimono 憑き物 bewitched, possessed -

Being bewitched by a fox, badger, a Yokai or other ill-meaning foe was pretty common in Japan,
there are many legends and tales about it.

Another expression, often used with the fox or badger, is
kitsune ni bakasareru 狐に化かされる

Here is also a book on how to get rid of a possession or bewitchment.



憑き物の落とし方 ― 自分でできる陰陽道の作法
石田千尋

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- quote -
Tsukimono – The Possessing Thing
There are eight million gods and monsters in Japan, and more than a few of them like to ride around in human bodies from time to time. Yurei. Kappa. Tanuki. Tengu. Kitsune. Snakes. Cats. Horses. Almost anything can possess a human. But when they do, they are all known by a single name—Tsukimono, the Possessing Things.

What Does Tsukimono Mean?
Tsukimono is a straight forward term. It combines the kanji 憑 (tsuki; possession) + 物 (mono; thing). There is a different word for actual possession 憑依 (hyoi), which is the kanji 憑 (tsuki again, but this time pronounced hyo—because Japanese is hard) + 依 (I; caused by).

Although they are collectively known as tsukimono, different types of tsukimono use –tsuki as a suffix, such as kappa-tsuki (河童憑; kappa possession), tengu-tsuki (天狗憑; tengu possession), or the most common of all, kitsune-tsuki (狐憑; fox possession).

(憑 is an odd kanji by the way. It can do double duty not only as the verb tsuku (憑く; to possess) but also as a kanji for tanomu (憑む; to ask a favor). So in a strange way, possession means asking a favor of someone—really, really hard.)

Shinto God Possession
“The number of possessing spirits in Japan is something enormous. It is safe to say that no other nation of forty millions of people has ever produced its parallel" - Percival Lowell .....
..... this kind of God Possession—known alternately as kamiyadori (神宿り; kami dwelling), kamioroshi (神降ろし; kami descending), or kamigakari (神懸り; divine possession) –is different from tsukimono. .....

Tsukimono – Yokai and Animal Possession .....
..... it is always involuntary on the part of the possessed. No one invites a tsukimono into their body. .....
Types of Tsukimono – Snakes, Foxes, and Everything Else.....
- - - - - Mizuki Shigeru agrees with Percival Lowell. In his Mujyara, series he identifies the following types of possession. It is is by no means meant to be a complete list:

• Jizo-tsuki – Possession by Jizo
• Hannya-tsuki – Hannya possession
• Gaki-tsuki – Hungry Ghost possession
• Ikiryo-tsuki – Living Ghost possession
• Shibito-tsuki – Ghost possession
• Kappa-tsuki – Kappa possession
• Tengu-tsuki – Tengu possession
• Neko-tsuki – Cat possession
• Hebi-tsuki – Snake possession
• Tanuki-tsuki – Tanuki possession
• Uma-tsuki – Horse possession
• Inu-tsuki – Dog possession
• Kitsune-tsuki – Fox possession




Kitsune-tsuki is by far the most common type of tsukimono. It is also different from other tsukimono—instead of the possessed taking on fox-attributes, kitsune-tsuki feels like a bodily attack, with shortness of breath, phantom pains, speaking in strange voices, and epileptic fits. Kitsune-tsuki symptoms resembled classic demonic possession in Western culture.
- read the article here
- source : Zack Davisson -

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- quote
Witchcraft in Japan: The Roots of Magical Girls
..... Just like in the West, people in pre-modern Japan often explained phenomena like illness, floods and other misfortunes with evil spirits. In Japan’s case, these evil spirits were thought to take the shape of animals: dogs, badgers, and especially foxes. These tsukimono (憑き物, “possessing beings”) took possession of people in their search for food or other creature comforts. When they did so, bad luck, illness, and other misfortunes befell the possessed and those around them.



Alternatively, some people weren’t possessed by tsukimono but kept them as pets or familiars. It is these people who are considered witches. Having tsukimono was usually a family affair. Families who owned tsukimono were known as tsukimono-suji (憑き物筋) or tsukimono-zukai (憑き物使い). In these cases, the tsukimono could have a beneficial impact on their handlers, bringing wealth and prosperity. And on the flip side, they were thought to bring illness and bad luck to anyone the owners dislike. This resulted in the families being feared and respected, but also ostracized.

People were hesitant to do business with such a family, and they had trouble selling property. In addition, the tsukimono were inheritable through the female line, making it nearly impossible for these women to find husbands. Tsukimono could not be disinherited or disowned, but one could attempt exorcisms with a Shinto priest, female medium or other spirit specialists. In Tohoku and Kyushu prefectures, religious practitioners and not families were thought to wield tsukimono. So these people could not only cure you of tsukimono possession but curse you with it, too.

Often these tsukimono-suji were simply wealthier than their neighbors. When jealous tongues started wagging and the rumors stuck, the family would be marked forever. As in Europe and America, being accused of this sort of witchcraft had a negative impact on the families’ lives. Nevertheless, belief in these tsukimono was widespread. Cases of spirit possession as late as 1997 have been recorded.

In Japan, witchcraft wasn’t exclusive to women, although it’s interesting to note that the tsukimono are passed down generation to generation through the female line. This seems to affirm a widespread global belief that women are more capable of – and likely to be involved in – witchcraft.

Perhaps predictably, cats also feature in Japanese witch stories. Hundreds of years ago, it was a common belief that girls who visited a temple after the sun went down risked being targeted by a witch. The witch, disguised as a kindly old woman, would lure the girl to her house with the promise of a warm bed for the night. Once inside, the witch would resume her ordinary, frightening form and promptly devour the girl. And because cats often hung around temples, it was believed that they were witches in disguise, waiting for their next victim.



Today, a witch can be good or evil, and not always as self-serving as our ancestors believed. Japan’s magical girls have come a long way from their spirit-wielding roots and are hardly seen as evildoers but rather as guardians and protectors. Looking at certain prominent anime and manga that feature magical girls, one will notice that there’s always some sort of familiar either bestowing the magical gift upon the protagonists or, at least, helping out with it. .....
- source : japanistas.com/en/archives

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憑き物 - 鳥飼 否宇


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. Jizo Bosatsu - 地蔵菩薩 .

Jizoo tsuki 地蔵憑き Possession by Jizo

Tofu Jizo 豆腐地蔵
山梨県飽海郡松山町竹田 Yamanashi, 善応寺 Zeno-Ji
相馬地方では大病の人、もしくは紛失物などがある時は「地蔵憑け」という事をする。それは村の老婆や婦人などがやって来て円形に座り、村でもあまり賢くない子供一人を中に入れ、子供にお札を持たせ、周囲の人が口々に、
南無地蔵大菩薩 おつきやれ 地蔵さん 地蔵さん 地蔵さん 
とせめ立てると中の子供は一種の催眠作用か、ぶるぶると札をふるわせれば地蔵さんは憑いたのである。それを見て色々病のことなれば、薬の処方、又は医者の方角、失せ物なれば、その方角、距離、出るか、出ないかを聞くのである。それが当たる様で、時々地蔵憑きをする。
- reference : jabaranran.blogspot.jp/2014 -

- reference -

. Bakejizo, Bake-Jizo 化け地蔵 / 化地蔵 Jizo as a yokai monster .
obake Jizoo お化け地蔵 O-bake Jizo

. 東福院 Tofuku-In Tokyo .
豆腐地蔵 Tofu Bean Curd Jizo at Tofuku-in Temple

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. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. possessed by a fox 狐憑き .

. possessed by a Tanuki badger 狸憑き .


- reference : nichibun yokai database 妖怪データベース -
226 憑き物 to explore

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. - - - Join my Kappa friends on facebook ! - - - .

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. Kappa densetsu 河童伝説, Kappa minwa 河童民話 - Legends - Introduction .

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .


. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

- #tsukimono #bewitched #possessed -
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12/01/2015

Kappa Legends Contents

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. Kappa densetsu 河童伝説, Kappa minwa 河童民話 - Legends - Introduction .
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- Kappa Legends to explore -

- quote
近藤せいけんによるかっぱのお話。

*** かっぱのお話 ***
①相模川の河童
②太郎河童の夢
③相模のかっぱ漬け
④河童のお使い
⑤相模の河童さくらの宴へ
⑥相模の河童まつり
⑦相模の河童まつり宴たけなわ
⑧相模の河童村 三流
⑨河童の名工 甚五郎
⑩名工甚五郎とかっぱ堂
⑪太郎河童と小童
⑫かっぱ村三流のお土産
⑬厚木宿のかっぱ屋
⑭かっぱのなみだ 1 Kappa no namida - tears of Kappa

中津川の鮎姫
小鮎川のかっぱと白龍
*** かっぱの詩 ***
かっぱ音頭
かっぱサンバ

- the hyperlinks are here
- source : kindai-karate.jp/minwa_kappa


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. - - - Join my Kappa friends on facebook ! - - - .

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. Kappa densetsu 河童伝説, Kappa minwa 河童民話 - Legends - Introduction .

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .


. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

- #kappalegends -
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9/03/2015

Miyazaki Kappa Legends

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- KAPPA 河童 伝説 / かっぱ / カッパ - Legends -
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- Kappa Legends from Miyazaki  河童伝説 - 宮崎県


- KAPPA 河童伝説 - 九州 - Legends from Kyushu -
- Introduction -
Fukuoka / Kagoshima / Kumamoto / Nagasaki / Oita / Saga



CLICK for more photos from Kappa in Kyushu.

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- - - - - In Miyazaki, the Kappa is known by many names locally:

. hyoosubo ヒョウスボ カッパ /兵主坊 Hyosubo .
Suiten 水天, 水神 deity of the water and also deity of the mountains (Yama no Kami 山の神)
ひょうすんぼ Hyosunbo
ひょうすえ Hyosue、ひょうすぼ, ヒョオスボ Hyoosubo、ヒョウスンボ Hyoosunbo、ひょうすんべ Hyoosunbe

ガラッパ Garappa. ガマジロ Gamajiro and ガマジロドン, Gamajiro don, ガオロ Gaoro, ガグレサァ Gaguressa, ガツラ Gatsura, 。ガマッパ Gamappa, ガラッパ Garappa, ガラッポ Garappo, ガランボ Garanbo,
ガワタロ Gawataro, ダワタロオ Gawataroo, カワッパ Kawappa, ガワッパ Gawappa,
カワノトノ Kawa no Ton, ガワロ Gawaro,
スイテンボオズ Suiten Boozu, 。セコボオ Sekoboo,
ガグレ Gagure, ガグレン Gaguren, カリコボウ Karikobo,
ヤマンヒト Yama no Hito (Man of the Mountain) / カワンヒト Kawa no Hito (Man of the River)
カッパワロ Kappawaro

gawa is another reading of kawa, river.




Kappa Iwa 河童岩 The Kappa Rock
Once upon a time
there lived one Kappa in the river. One day many children came to the river to play and threw a white pebble 白い小石 in the water. Now they jumped in and tried to find the white stone.
Suddenly, the Kappa appeared in the water and asked:
"May I become your friend and play with you?"
But the children knew that a Kappa will pull out and eat their anus, so they became afraid and wanted to run away.


Illustration by かわさき えり Kawasaki Eri

But the Kappa called on them:
"Let's have a competition and see who wins. I will give this fish to the winner!"
He showed them a fish on a bamboo skewer.

The rest of the story is here in Japanese
- source : minwa.fujipan.co.jp/area/miyazaki -
宮崎県の昔話
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Karikoboo カリコボウ / かりこ坊 Karikobo, Karkio Bo, the Kappa
Kakariboozu カリコボウズ Kakari Bozu


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In the 米良市 Mera district
かりこ坊 Karikobo is venerated as Yama no Kami 山の神 a deity of the Mountain. He likes to play tricks on people, especially imitating the sound in the forest like cutting a tree or causing a landslide or shooting a hunter's guns. But he never puts humans into real danger. When people hear him making strange sounds, it is best to keep quiet and pretend not to hear anything.

. doshakuzure 土砂崩れ landslide legends .

If you think he is close, he will show up far in the mountain. If you think he is down in the valley, he will shout out high in the moutain.
If he comes close, animals will catch its vibes and become afraid. Dogs and horses are expecially sensitive to his appearance.

He likes to take a bath. If you do not keep the bath water boiling hot, he will sneek into the bathroom. If he has taken a bath in a home, the water becomes all smelly like the toilet.

At the 秋彼岸 Autumn solstice he begins to walk up the mountain ridge (to become Yama no Kami, Deity of the Mountain.
A the 春彼岸 Spring solstice he comes down to the river (to become Kawa no Kami, Deity of the River and Water).

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児湯郡 Koyu district 西米良村 Nishi Mera

Hyosubo ひょすぼ / Hyoosunbo ひょうすんぼ
Once a Samurai killed a かりこ坊 Kariko Bo by accident and burried him secretely.
His wife soon became pregnant, but the child was killed by the Kariko Bo.
A Mountain Priest told them this was the curse of the Mountain Deity, so they built a proper grave 山神塚 for the dead Kariko Bo.


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- reference : nichibun yokai database -



source : fragezeichen.web.fc2.com/mononoke

佐脇嵩之 Sawaki Suoshi (1707 - 1772)

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....................................................................... Miyazaki 宮崎県 

. Kappa and Legends with tofu  豆腐伝説 .
from temple 泉福寺 Zenpuku-Ji, Takachiho

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On the 5th day of the 5th lunar month (Boy's Festival) you have to eat tsunonoboo つののぼう (?角の坊) to prevent water accidents caused by the Kappa.
Once a Kappa invited a farmer to do Sumo wrestling, but the farmer refused, saying he has to go home to eat tsunonoboo. This kept him safe from the mischievious Kappa.


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木城町 Kijo



At the Kawabaru Nature Park かわばる自然公園 is a bronze statue of a Kappa.

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Every year after the autumn equinox the Kappa climbs to the mountain, moaning ピーヒョピーヒョ (piihiyo piihiyo) and playing tricks on the way.
Once he used the bath of a home on his way and people know he was there when the bathwater was all black and smelled terrible. So the farmer captured a monkey and bound him to the bathroom wall 風呂場. The Kappa came at night and was surprized, got angry and shook the house like in an earthquake. Then he left and never came back.

Once there lived a Kappa family near the riverpool. When the farmer gave them three tail hairs of his horse for fishing, the Kappa showed great gratitude to the family.


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Hyoosunbo ひょうすんぼ Hyosunbo

In the year 1489 an ancestor of the 正一家 Masakazu family wanted to cross the river on a horse. A Hyosunbo grabed the tail of the horse and to get rid of him he had to cut off the right arm and take it home. Later the Hyosunbo came to his house and asked for his arm back. To show his gratitude he showed the family how to make medicine using the bark of the mountain peach tree (yamamomo 山桃の木, Myrica rubra), 茶の葉 tea leaves and もち米 mochigome sticky rice. This powerful medicine heals broken bones, bruises and even stomach ailments.
The family brings ritual sake and thank-you offerings to the river every year on the last day of december.


Hyosunbo, this is a Yokai monster with the name Hyoosube ひょうすべ Hyosube
ひょうすえ Hyosue、ひょうすぼ Hyoosubo、ヒョウスンボ Hyoosunbo、ひょうすんべ Hyoosunbe

. Hyōzu 兵主神 Hyozu no Kami .
and
兵主部 Hyōsube the Yokai Monster


and a strong liquor with this name 芋焼酎 ひょうすんぼ
from 松露酒造 Shoro Shozo / 宮崎県串間市




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清武町 Kiyotake - Ioya Kiyotakechō Funahiki

The company 庵屋の北山様 Kitayama sama from Ioya venerated the Kappa.
Once a villager had shot a Kappa carrying some cucumbers. But afterwards that man got ill himself and died.
So now they venerate the Kappa.

In a pond with cold water in the dark forest below a sanctuary there lives a Kappa.

There is also a liquor made in Kiyotake, with the name
Kappa no sasoi-mizu 河童の誘い水 "water to invite a Kappa".



宮崎県宮崎市清武町加納甲2677−1

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上使橋 Joshibashi

The Kappa from the bridge Joshibashi tried to pull a horse into the river but got caught.


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宮崎市 Miyazaki town

A Kappa from the waterway of 松井いぜき / 井堰 Matsui Izeki had come to a farmhouse to get the liver of a horse. But two strong men named 太吉 Takichi and 次郎 Jiro made sure the Kappa did not come.



松井用水路 / いぜき waterways and seki せき(堰) weirs along the river 清武川 Kiyotakegawa.
This has been constructed by the official 松井五朗兵衛 Matsui Gorobei from 飫肥 Obi around 1643 to gain farmland for the poor villagers.


source : Kyushu regional agricaltual administration office

In 1934 the weir had been rebuilt in concrete.


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西臼杵郡 Nishiusuki 高千穂町 Takachiho

On the border of Kumamoto, Oita and Miyazaki there is upstream the shrine 川上神社 Kawakami Jinja.
Once a Kappa came to the priest Ando 安藤氏 and asked to remove the Yatsume 八つ目のもの. The priest demanded in return that the Kappa would not take away the children of the village any more and then let him go.
The Yatsume was in fact the harrow used for preparing the rice fields 馬鍬. To show his gratitude the Kappa brought fresh fish every day.
But one day, when the priest had forgotten to take away his knife at the fish deposit, the Kappa did not come any more. And children began to have water accidents again. Therefore priest Ando took his knife again and cut off the arm of the Kappa. This arm is still in the possession of the temple to our day - or so they say.

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川太郎湯 Kawataro Yu in Takachiho

Once people dug a dent into the riverbed, stopped the water into a pool and threw hot stones in it for a bath. Then suddenly a Kappa also slipped into the hot water and in no time the water became lukewarm. But this "hot spring" is said to heal all kinds of ailments.


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高鍋町 Takanabe

In the garden of 鴫野の水神様 the Water Deity of Shigino a Kappa came for a complaint.
The horse of the deity had been to the river nearby and bitten off the arm of the Kappa.
After a discussion they burried it near Mount Utonoyama ウトノヤマ, a place rather dark even in daytime. Now the Kappa came back every day to ask for his arm and eventually they showed him the place. Since then the Kappa never showed up again.


There are also ひょうすん坊 Hyosunbo legends in Takanabe.
高鍋ひょうすんぼ伝説
There is also a pub called like this 「ひょうすんぼ」という居酒屋
and a Hyosunbo road with many Kappa statues called 「ひょうすんぼ通り」


statue at Hyosunbo Road

Takanabe is next to 木城町 Kijo town.

Once upon a LONG time,
there lived a good priest and his young acolyte in the temple Enpuku-Ji 宮田の円福寺 . . .

- and another legend

むか~しむかし、 Once upon a LONG time,
木の瀬の小丸川河原は ものすごく川幅の広い瀬になってました。
しかも水がとてもキレイで、川遊びのメッカになってました。
大人も子供も 魚を取ったり水遊びしたり、それは大賑わいだったそうです。
- source : miyazaki-cci.or.jp/takanabe -



Hyosunbo Kappa Kokeshi ひょうすんぼ


source : kappauv.com kokeshi


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- - - - - reference - - - - -
- source : Yokai Database -

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. - - - Join my Kappa friends on facebook ! - - - .

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- KAPPA 河童 / 合羽 / かっぱ / カッパ - Legends -
- Introduction -

. Legends and Tales from Japan 伝説 - Introduction .

. mukashibanashi 昔話 folktales - Introduction .
the distinction to legends is sometimes blurred.


. Kappa ishi 河童石 Kappa stone legends
Kappa iwa かっぱ岩 Kappa boulder, Kappa rock .



. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

- #kappamiyazaki #miyazakilegends #hyosunbo -
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[ . BACK to DARUMA MUSEUM TOP . ]
[ . BACK to WORLDKIGO . TOP . ]

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8/19/2015

Kaido roads yurei yokai

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- KAPPA - 河童 / かっぱ / カッパ - ABC-Index -

. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .
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- Kaido Ancient Roads - Yokai and Yurei 街道の妖怪 - 幽霊 -



Japan developed a nationwide network of roads and highways already in the 7th century to carry things on foot, horseback, and wheeled traffic and to transport goods between towns and villages. The major roads, called kaido, started from the capital in Kyoto.

. 日本の街道 Kaidoo The Ancient Roads of Japan .

Along the roads there developed a lot of monsters and ghosts . . .

- under construction -
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- - - - - from North to South - - - - -

北海道 樺太 Hokkaido / Sakhalin

ケナシコルウナルペ
イワイセポ
アルサラウス
ミンツチノトノ
ヤカラカムイトノ、
シラルポンチャチャ
オパスホロケウポ
ケムラムカムイ

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東山道 Tosando

磐州 Banshu Fukushima 福島県
麻積婆、泥鰌娘、かすごうじの乙姫、七曲坂の鬼、橙色の飛物、猫の御新造

江州 Eshu Shiga 滋賀県
南覚花、影向杉、お鍋松の蛇、茄子婆、腥地蔵

岩州 Ganshu Fukushima 福島県
てんころりん、魂の鳩、丸山のおさん、朱の盤、布引山の蛇

飛州 Hishu Gifu 岐阜県
千光寺の鐘、大きな岩魚、南瓜蛇、鼠石、天狗髭、豆梅坊の火

上州 Joshu Gunma 群馬県
黒鼬、おぼ、大馬神、権現沼、けろけろ、くだん、赤い巾着、洗濯婆、蜘蛛が淵の主、鬼の遊び場のお婆
. kawa tengu 川天狗 "river Tengu" .

陸奥 Mutsu Aomori 青森県
さだ、臼背負、三毛猫の婆様、人形の坊様、てん転ばし、茶殻子、左京沼の主

濃州 Noshu Gifu 岐阜県
関の太郎、狗賓の鼻息、元正狐、袋被せ、遣ろか水、ついたか見てくろ

陸中 Rikuchu Iwate 岩手県
ぬえ Nue、釜歌、谺、小松の姫、 六兵衛岩、ぼこ

陸前 Rikuzen Miyagi 宮城県
大海老、ざんびき童、ねんねんぐ、唸り坂の大獺、もぞこい

信州 Shinshu Nagano 長野県
両葉芒、このこに困る、空木岳の鹿、甘酒婆、薬缶吊

羽後 Ugo Akita 秋田県
紺絣の化物、狐巡査、丈高女、小又の親杉、ふふぎの貝、生垣揺、林檎怪

羽前 Uzen Yamagata 山形県
おわおわ鳥、二度びっくり、針雑魚、釜っこ下がり、付句の執念、しょけら

野州 Yashu   Ibaraki 栃木県
飛銚子、金色姫、三本杉の精、高鳥山の大亀


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東海道 Tokaido

尾州 Bishu Aichi 愛知県
長田蟹、衣太郎狐、かわらんべの娘、大女、姫取ヶ池の妖怪、化道蜘蛛、土鴉

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房州 Boshu Chiba 千葉県
雷鼬
熊野の三太郎
紫池の主
海入道

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. Bushu 武州 : Tokyo 東京都、Chiba 千葉県、Saitama 埼玉県 - Edo 江戸 .

kuchisake onna 口裂け女 slit-mouthed woman
haifuri tanuki 灰降狸 the ash-throwing Tanuki
isogashi いそがし "busy busy" 
kioicho no densha 紀尾井町の電車 the train from Kioi village
kurokamikiri 黒髪切 black hair cutter
onimusume, oni-musume 鬼娘 demon daughter
ooji no kitsune 王子の狐 the Fox from Oji
ooki na otoko 大きな男 the huge man
tachifusagari たちふさがり twister, whirlwind

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遠州 Enshu Shizuoka 静岡県、Aichi 愛知県

山住さん
大人淵の竜
田中の火の玉
川猿 - Kappa
夜なき婆

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賀州 Gaishu Mie 三重県

鐘喰虫
狒々猿

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常州 Joshu Ibaragi 茨城県

いくち
ぞくぞく
狢雪洞
臼子

甲州 Koshu Yamanashi 山梨県
赤牛、怠け神、治部虫、追分の唐蜀黍、ゆきおに、笠借狐、小豆そぎ婆

三州 Sanshu Aichi 愛知県
笛場怪、孫八狐、雌岩雄岩、大鰻魚、おぶめ塚、片脚上臈、二竜松の精

勢州 Seishu Mie 三重県
すててぎてぎよ、人鬼、水鼬、蛍の幽霊、かっち鮫、父ヶ谷の牛鬼

志州 Shishu Mie 三重県
黒森の鬼、山椒びらし、かんころぼし、蒟蒻虫

総州 Soshu Chiba 千葉県、Ibaraki 茨城県
利根川の大鯉、隠し婆、金網、禿切小僧、山のおばけ、大唐が鼻の化物

相州 Soshu Kanagawa 神奈川県
お宮の化物、おさよならい、おはんさん、釣瓶坂、土用坊主、お化け梟

駿州 Sunshu Shizuoka 静岡県
宇津の谷の鬼、白鳥山の白坊主、なめだら牛、千本の化物、五色蔦の精

豆州 Zushu - Izu - Shizuoka 静岡県
狩野の古釜、大滝の主、天狗の蜜柑、乳っこ担ぎ


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北陸道 Hokurikudo

越後 Echigo Nigata 新潟県

dannasama 旦那様
kangirikko 禿切子
Kappa no onna 河童の女 female Kappa from the river 糸魚川 Itoigawa
toofuneko 豆腐猫 Tofu Cat
shirotsubu 白田螺 white Tanishi mud snail
yama kara kei 山から鶏
yokizutzu hebi 横筒蛇
yoru no mimizu 夜蚯蚓

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越前 Echizen Fukui 福井県

bisha ga tsuku びしゃがつく
iburiyama 飯降山
mangabuchi no nushi 馬鍬淵の主
narita なりた
oharugitsune おはる狐 the fox O-Haru
Tengu no unga 天狗の浮塵子
tsubaki joro 椿女郎 "camellia prostitute"

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越中 Etchu Toyama 富山県
滑川の大章魚、海の猩々、蟹嫁様、妖鼠、せんぽくかんぽく、くたべ

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加州 Kashu Ishikawa 石川県
大おに、火の玉爺さん、ぼんぼしょ、火取魔、斧坂の化物、長面妖女、ぐず

若州 Nyakushu Fukui 福井県
善徳虫、大青蛙、女郎魚、およね狐

能州 Noshu Ishikawa 石川県
山燈、茶釜下、みずくし、猿鬼、赤蜂、桃ヶ瀑

佐渡 Sado Niigata 新潟県
碁盤波、雪隠鬼、臼負婆、海禿、衾 fusuma


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畿内 Kinai - Kyoto Osaka Nara

城州 Joshu Kyoto 京都府
異電、毛虫の大坊主、片輪車、尻目、辰己大明神、橋姫

河州 Kashu Osaka 大阪府
赤子淵の主、門真のお三、納戸爺さん、芒おばけ、姥が火、悪火

泉州 Senshu Osaka 大阪府
卵の獄卒、土生のおさん

摂州 Sesshu Osaka, Hyogo 大阪府、兵庫県
赤渕、明月姫、目無し稚児、箕面山の天狗、源兵衛狸

和州 Washu Nara 奈良県
破石、鏡池の火の玉、ごんずい、山あらし、金の蛙、べとべとさん、筐転り

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Sanyodo 山陽道

播州 Banshu Hyogo 兵庫県
阿菊虫、とます、淡桃躑躅、菅笠著た子、誰袖坂、蛸山伏

備州 Bishu Okayama 岡山県、Hiroshima 広島県
蜘女房、骨喰猫、おじち山のおさん、西大寺梵鐘、米噛石、生姜の呻声、焚朗火

防州 Boshu Yamaguchi 山口県
八の字狸、二人大坊主、柿の葉の化物、馬糞ヶ岳の大蛇、枇杷精

長州 Choshu Yamaguchi 山口県
お月さんの蜘蛛、ひけ、山みさき、平家蟹

芸州 Geishu Hiroshima 広島県
一本角、七鍋、宮写貝、傾城ヶ淵の主

作州 Sakushu Okayama 岡山県
保木の大蛇、こそこそ、蘇鉄の化物、牛飼いの雲雀、栗姫、宇兵衛どん宇兵衛どん、
杓子岩、樽岩


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山陰道 Sanindo

伯州 Hakushu Tottori 鳥取県
ごいぞう、勝手のええ蜘蛛、銀兜怪、まかげ

因州 Inshu Tottori 鳥取県
甘露落とし、種の藤助の嬶、蛇の医者、囲炉裏の婆

隠岐 Oki Island Shimane 島根県
山姥蜘蛛、魔法飯綱、もた、やさい艪、七尋女房

石州 Sekishu Shimane 島根県
蓑を着た大男、獺の小豆磨、綿売り三匁、菖蒲がさこの婆、菅笠下、女郎虫

丹州 Tanshu (Tanba) Kyoto 京都府
衣章魚、大蛇の姉妹、白い幕、片枝松、渡柄杓、筵の手

但州 Tanshu Hyogo 兵庫県
但馬の大章魚、念仏谷の鼬、こんこんさんの道、井垣甚十郎、辻坊主

雲州 Unshu Shimane 島根県
鎧蛙、壁の上の抜首、飛藁束、鮗の宮、おしみ


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南海道 Nankaido - Shikoku

阿州 Ashu Tokushima 徳島県
お福石、天神様の銀杏、鬼飯銭、お芳狸、袖もぎさん、芥子坊主、夜行さん

紀州 Kishu Wakayama 和歌山県
海犬、目塗り、子犬のようなもの、小原淵の竜女、平家の旗竹、岩の侍

讃州 Sanshu (Sanuki) Kagawa 香川県
おしょぼ、高壁、大鰈、狸の石、蛇の目傘の呵々、高松の怪魚、亀蛭子、猫の外道

淡州 Tanshu Hyogo 兵庫県
しとりの池の大蛇、安乎の海坊主、かりかり

土州 Toshu Tosa Kochi 高知県
しばてん、羽指鯨、狸の自転車、山父、箸舐兎、手杵返、おちちんぷんぷん、山鰐

予州 Yoshu Ehime 愛媛県
おやま女郎、隠神刑部、牛鬼、砂洗い、風ぶれ

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西海道 Saikaido - Kyushu

豊州 Bushu Oita 大分県
鬼新太夫、法螺の貝、八幡の森の鬼、鼬の塗壁、兄弟割石、ひとだま、空木返し、ししこり

筑州 Chikushu Fukuoka 福岡県
ぼっくりしょ、鼠娘、阿弥陀がむね、御寺の鬼、山神椿、寿命貝、人食い幽霊、めら、山哭、司生虫、

肥州 Hishu - Saga, Nagasaki, Kumamoto 佐賀県、長崎県、熊本県
石渚女、蛸聟殿、野狐小僧、御辛労の池、南蛮井戸、坊様鯨、いでもち、油すまし、一ッちょ目、豆腐娘

壱岐 Iki Island Nagasaki 長崎県
かしゃの雨、塗坊、美しい傘、舟しとぎ、湯坊主

隅州 Gushu Kagoshima 鹿児島県
早馬殿、一反木綿、二反ばえ、おじどん

日州 Hisshu Miyazaki 宮崎県
百椀とどろ、とんごし婆、貧乏枇杷、無いもん食う、むき、ひょうずんぼ

薩州 Sasshu Satsuma Kagoshima 鹿児島県
下い股、火の斎の雉、甕壺の化物、銭排猪、お耳長様   小倉の海女、米蛸、ぬっぺっ坊、このつきとっこう

対州 Taishu Nagasaki 長崎県
蜷割り、十六日烏賊、さすれい、にんじん

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琉球 Ryukyu Kagoshima - Okinawa 鹿児島県 ー 沖縄県

akamataa アカマター dangerous serpent
- source : yokai database -

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dangasamajimun ダンガサマジムン

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kijimunaa キジムナー Kijimuna



The Kijimuna (キジムナー Kijimunaa) are creatures of the mythology native to the island of Okinawa. The kijimuna are small wood spirits according to Okinawan mythology.
They are said to look around three or four years old and have red hair.
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !


kenmun 水蝹 Kenmun
a kappa/kijimunaa hybrid
Kenmun are hairy water and tree spirits from the Amami islands in southern Japan.
- reference source : Matt Alt -

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nakanodakarinusuuyooi ナカンダカリヌスーヨーイ

ushinoshita unagu 牛舌女 woman with a bull tongue

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zan ザン
From the Amami islands 奄美諸島



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- source : wakanmomomikan.yu-nagi.com -

幽霊街道 Yurei Kaido
- source : Yokai Database - - 84


. 日本の街道 Kaidoo The Ancient Roads of Japan .
- Introduction -


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. - - - Join my Kappa friends on facebook ! - - - .

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. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .


. Kappa densetsu 河童伝説, Kappa minwa 河童民話 - Legends - Introduction .


. Minwa 民話 folktales / densetsu 伝説 Japanese Legends .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .

- #kappakaidoyokai #yokaikaido #kaidoyokai -
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8/01/2015

Tofu Kozo

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. yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - Introduction .
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- Toofu Kozoo, Tōfu kozō 豆腐小僧 Tofu Kozo, The Tofu Boy -

. Bean curd ( 豆腐 toofu, Tofu, Dofu) .
- Introduction -
Tofu is made made by coagulating soy milk, and then pressing the resulting curds into blocks.


CLICK for more photos !

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- quote
Tōfu-kozō – The Tofu Boy
Zack Davisson
On a dark and stormy night Edo night, if you should happen to turn around and see a giant baby dressed in an enormous bamboo hat and carrying a wiggly block of tofu festooned with a maple leaf, don’t panic. Despite the strange appearance, it is only Tofu Kozo, one of the most harmless of all of Japan’s bizarre yokai tribe.



Who is Tofu Kozo?
One of Japan’s most popular yokai, the name Tofu Kozo is most commonly translated as “tofu boy” or “tofu kid,” although a more literal—albeit clumsy—translation would be “tofu young Buddhist priest.” But the Buddhist associations don’t run any deeper than the name, with “kozo” being a common term for young boys in Japan.

Tofu Kozo generally appears as a small boy, or even a baby, in a giant, conical bamboo rain hat and a traditional kimono. The kimono can be plain, or highly decorated with daruma figures, red rockfish, horned owls, and taiko drums, all of which were thought to be talismans against small pox during the Edo period. As the same suggests, Tofu Kozo are never seen without a plate of tofu, which is decorated with a single maple leaf impression.

Lacking any special powers or features other than appearance, Tofu Kozo is said to wander through deserted city streets at night, or during the rain. Generally shy and timid, Tofu Kozo sometimes likes to sneak behind humans and follow them through the streets.

There is little agreement about Tofu Kozo amongst writers. Some say that there is only one Tofu Kozo, and that he is a sort of yokai prince, the son of the yokai supreme commander Mikoshi Nyudo and his wife the Rokurokubi. Some say that tofu kozo are nothing more than errand boys for the yokai, rushing back and forth on endless tasks.

From the Showa era and up, there have been accounts of Tofu Kozu as meeting people on rainy streets at night, and offering up some delicious tofu. Anyone who eats the tofu finds their body growing with mold from the inside until they die. Yokai researchers Kyougoku Natsuhiko and Yamaguchi Bintaro trace this legend as having been invented for for childrens’ books in the Showa era to give the Tofu Kozo a bit more of an edge for modern readers.

One the opposite side, in modern Japan therapists have been using Tofu Kozo as a yokai who gets bullied by other yokai, and is used in anti-bullying therapy and education.

The Origin of Tofu Kozo
Tofu Kozo has the unique status of being Japan’s first modern, city-bred yokai. Unlike other yokai that sprang from ancient and rural Japan, the Tofu Kozo has no folklore heritage, no appearances in traditional folktales or legends. He arrived fully formed suddenly during the Anei era (1772-1781), where he quickly became a popular character for picture books, kabuki performances, toys, advertisements, cookbooks, and yellow-covered kiboshi illustrated stories.

There are several theories as to the origin of Tofu Kozo. One aspect is tofu itself. The urban Edo period saw the rise of tofu as a popular food source, cheap and nutritious. One picture book of the time, Edo Meisho Zue (江戸名所図会) “Collection of Pictures of the Famous Places of Edo” by Hasegawa Settan, shows tofu dealers wearing the iconic conical bamboo hat as they travel the streets back and forth with their wares. Other illustrations from the period show yokai like tanuki and kappa carrying tofu, and it is speculated that some enterprising tofu dealer might have created Tofu Kozo as an advertising character for their shop, only to see the character’s popularity run away from them.

Mizuki Shigeru gives the location of Tofu Kozo as Satsuma province, modern day Kagoshima prefecture, although the character is seen all over Japan. During the Edo period, when the 100 candle storytelling game of Hyakumonogatari Kaidankai was popular, game players and storytellers were always on the lookout for new yokai stories to tell, and it is likely that the legend of Tofu Kozo was created and expanded upon during numerous storytelling sessions.

The first known print appearance of Tofu Kozo is in the 1777 kiboshi illustrated book “Bakemono Shiuchi Hyoban-ki” (妖怪仕内評判記; “Commentary on Notable Events of the Yokai”), written by Koikawa Harumachi. A few years later in 1782, he appeared in a popular tofu cookbook called “Tofu Hyakuchin” (豆腐百珍; “The 100 Curiosities of Tofu”) by Hitsujun Ka. The character continued to be popular through the Meiji era.

The Many Faces of Tofu Kozo
Because there is no traditional origin for Tofu Kozo, artists have depicted him in varying ways over the years. Early descriptions describe him as having an enormous head, like an overgrown baby. Koikawa Harumachi described him this way in “Bakemono Shiuchi Hyoban-ki,” and the artist Kitao Masayoshi even named him Ogashira Kozo, meaning “Big Head Boy,” in his 1787 picture book “Bakemono Chakutōchō” (夭怪着到牒). For a short time, it was popular to draw Tofu Kozo as having only one eye, but this fad soon faded and by 1853 Tofu Kozu was drawn looking like a normal young boy, as seen in the illustrated book “Kyoka Hyakumonogatari” (狂歌百物語).

An obvious relative of Tofu Kozo is Hitotsume Kozo, meaning the One-Eyed Boy. Although Hitotsume Kozo is an older, more traditional yokai, over the years the two have come to resemble each other as their stories and appearances merged. This has caused researchers to postulate that they are the same yokai. But while they have had obvious influences on each other—and are depicted as cousins in many modern yokai stories—they are generally considered to be separate characters.
- source : Zack Davisson

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- quote -
Tōfu-kozō (豆腐小僧, literally tofu boy) is a yōkai of Japan, and is a yōkai that takes on the appearance of a child possessing a tray with tōfu on it. It is a yōkai that frequently appears in the kusazōshi and kibyōshi and kaidan books from the Edo period, and from the Bakumatsu to the Meiji period, people have become familiar with them as a character illustrated on toys[2] such as kites, sugoroku, and karuta. They can also be seen in senryū, kyōka, e-hon banzuke (pamphlets that introduce the contents of a shibai), and nishiki-e, etc.


"Ōjidai Karano Bakemono" by Shuntei Katsukawa.
An example of a tōfu-kozō with one eye.


. . . Based on the folk belief that hitotsume-kozō like tōfu, and since there was the card in yōkai karuta called "Boy with His Toungue Out Licking a Tōfu (した出し小僧のとうふなめ?," as well as senryū poems such as
"behind the tōfu shop there is a one-eyed boy
(豆腐やのうらは一つ目小僧也 to-o-fu-ya-no/u-ra-ha-hi-to-tsu-me/ko-zo-u na-ri)"
and "
tōfu-kozō are one-dice-eyed fellows wearing kasa
(笠のうち眼は一ツ賽の目の奴んも化す豆腐小僧は),"
it has been pointed out that tōfu-kozō would thus be no more than an alternate name for hitotsume-kozō, but since there are many tōfu-kozō that don't have one eye, there is also the claim denying that they are the same as hitotsume-kozō, and that tōfu-kozō and hitotsume-kozō were created separately.
In any case, there are many parts that are still unclear, and there is still research going on about how tōfu-kozō developed.
- - - More in the WIKIPEDIA !

katame 片目 "with one eye" could well be a pun with katame 固め hard tofu

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. Hitotsume Kozoo 一つ目小僧 Hitotsume Kozo - Young Monk with One Eye .
and
一つ目小僧地蔵 Hitotsume Kozo Jizo



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- flying tofu -

雁鴨は我を見捨てゝ去りにけり
豆腐に羽根の無きぞ嬉しき


Goose and duck
leaving, I am out of luck
happily, I see
My tofu, lacking wings
cannot abandon me!


. Ryokan / Ryookan 良寛 (1758-1831) .


. Flying Tofu, discussion with Robin D. Gill .
Kyoka, Japan's Comic Verse: A Mad in Translation Reader
By Robin D. Gill

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Tofu Kozo and Daruma san !



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- - - - - Legends with tofu  豆腐伝説 - - - - -

The fox has a special relationship to tofu, especially fried tofu,
abura age 油揚げ.
They will be collected in a separate entry.

. kitsune 狐 fox legends .

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........................................................................... Tengu 天狗 the long-nosed goblin

Gunma 群馬県

Once upon a time
a Tengu turned himself into a boy apprentice and lived at the temple Kashozan. Once he went on an errand to 沼田 Numata, which takes about 30 minutes. The head priest had asked him in the morning to go and get some fresh tofu.
(今日できの豆腐 - kyo deki no tofu )
But today of all days, the boy returned only late in the evening.
When he arrived, the priest aksed him what had happened.
"Well, you told me to go to Kyoto to get some Tofu, so I went there!" (Being a Tengu, he could fly . . .)
(京できの豆腐 - Kyo (Kyoto) deki no tofu)
This is a pun on the sound of KYO.

. Kashozan 迦葉山 a Tengu mountain .

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Chiba 千葉県
The same story as above, from the town of 市原 Ichihara.


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Saitama 埼玉県 / Chichibu 秩父



In the remote Chichibu mountains is a waterfall with a 天狗岩 Tengu Rock, where once a Tengu lived. The priest from a nearby temple often asked him for an errand. When there were visitors at the temple, the Tengu would fly to to Kyoto in one blink of the eye and get some fresh Tofu.


. Tengu Legends 天狗伝説 - Introduction .

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source : ranryoutei.blog.shinobi.jp

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......................................................................................... Fukushima 福島県
三春町 Miharu

On the day 甲子 KINOE you can prepare all kinds of food, but Tofu has to be one of it.

. kinoe, ki no e, kasshi 甲子 day of the rat and element water .
The rat (mouse) is closely related to Daikoku.


......................................................................................... Gifu 岐阜県
高山市 Takayama

mujina ムジナ badger
Once an old man had walked all the way to 神岡 Kamioka to get some Tofu for the New Year celebrations, but on the way, a badger stole it from him.

. tanuki 狸 mujina, badger .


......................................................................................... Gunma 群馬県

rokusen 六算 calculating with SIX - ( 惣身六算 )

When someone is ill the cure is made by "calculating with six".
First take the age of the ill person and divide it by 9. The number can now be equated to a part of the body.
1 and 3 are legs, 2 and 6 are the sides, 4 is the stomach, 8 are the upper legs. 5 and 7 the shoulders.
If the healing was successful, offering of Tofu, sekihan 赤飯 red cooked rice and dango 団子 rice balls were made to the 稲荷 Inari deity.



......................................................................................... Ibaragi 茨城県
水戸市 Mito

12月8日と2月8日の夕に、豆腐を小さく切って葱とともに串に通して、門の両側にさしておくと邪気をはらうという。昔は大蒜をはさんだので、これを蒜豆腐という。
.
旧正月3日は三日月神社の縁日で、これに祈願すると子供の吹出物や疣が治るといわれている。豆腐の献供が多く、三日月信仰者はこの日は豆腐を食べないという。


......................................................................................... Iwate 岩手県
九戸郡

yama no kami 山の神

12月12日は山の神さんの年取りで、ゴエンニチともいう。山の神は12人の子どもを持っているのでストギと豆腐をそれぞれ12切れ供える。ストギをつくるのはたいてい女だが、食うと子どもを12人生むことになるため、女が食べてはいけない。


......................................................................................... Kagawa 香川県

hitobashira no rei 人柱の霊
亀山城を築城するとき、通りかかった豆腐屋を捕らえて生き埋めにし人柱にした。今でも雨のしとしと降る淋しい晩などは、「豆腐、豆腐」という悲しげな売り声が聞こえてくる。


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kuwasai (kasai) 火災,kitausoo 祈祷僧
13,4軒の家が焼失した。その前数日の間、付近に豆腐やこんにゃくが捨てられていたので奇妙に思ったが、聞けば、どこからか現れた祈祷僧が火災を予言し、逃れたければ金や豆腐、こんにゃくを捨てよといったためだという。不思議なことだ。


......................................................................................... Miyagi 宮城県

12月1日は水溢しの朔日で、長方形に切った豆腐を串に刺して、炉の四隅に立て、水をかけてから屋根に投げ上げて鳥に食わせると、火除けになるという。

仙台市 Sendai
Jooenboozuka 浄円坊塚
東照宮の下、東側の延寿院にある。東照宮別当仙岳院の僧浄円は足が速く、飯釜をかけて炊き上がらないうちに出羽の羽黒山に往復した。師の坊が重病で最上の豆腐を食べたいといったところ、即座に買ってきた。一生のうちに羽黒山に238回往復したという。元禄12年に76歳で示寂。鉄のワラジや大小のワラジが奉納してある。水疣が治るといわれ、お礼に酒や餅を塚に供える。



......................................................................................... Miyazaki 宮崎県
高千穂町 Takachiho

Kawataro 河太郎 Kappa
Once the priest from temple 泉福寺 Zenpuku-Ji threw a stone at the Kappa, but the stone hit the favorite food of this Kappa, his Tofu. When the priest came to the river the next time, there was a lot of water and he could not cross it. So he brought a piece of Tofu with a knife stuck in it, and the water retreated.
Now many visitors to this temple bring a piece of Tofu with a needle stuck in it as an offering.
針を刺した豆腐

. Legends - Kappa densetsu 河童伝説 .


......................................................................................... Nagasaki 長崎県
島原市 Shimabara

darashi だらし

ある人が、急用のため、十分にご飯を食べずに峠のところで、急に体がだるくなり、どうにも動けなくなった。連れの者に肩を借りて歩いていると、高野豆腐が一つ落ちていた。それを拾って食べると、けろりと元に戻った。だらしにつけられたのである。



......................................................................................... Niigata 新潟県
関川村 Sekikawa

Daikoku sama 大黒様
12月9日は大黒様の嫁取り・大黒様の祝言・オカタ迎え・大黒様の年取り・大黒様の年夜などといい、二股大根ときな粉餅・小豆餡餅・豆御飯・豆腐汁・打豆入汁・納豆・炒り豆の7色を供える。炒り豆は焙烙で3回炒り、一生枡に入れて、「大黒様大黒様豆振って聞かせます 耳あけて聞かれやれ 目あけて見しゃっしゃれ」とうたって供える。大黒様は耳が聞こえないという。

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konbu こんぶ

大年の晩には、ごぼう・こんにゃく・焼豆腐・コンブを煮た、「年取りのオヒラ」を食べる。これを食べると年を取る。特にコンブは「よろこんぶ」といい、必ず入れた。「年を取りたくない」と言ってこれを食べずに縁の下に隠れていると、余ったものを全部くれていっぺんに年を取ってしまったという話がある。

......................................................................................... Okinawa 沖縄県

mazumunu マズムヌ
マズムヌは山や人家に住む。人間が腹を叩いて「グッダ、グッディ」と泣くことを嫌う。酒や塩煮の魚、豆腐の刻んだものが好物である。


......................................................................................... Saitama 埼玉県
皆野町 Minano

oosaki おおさき a fox-like animal

人の世話をしたがうまくいかず、恨まれて病気になった老婆がいた。「豆腐が食いたい」というので持っていくと食べた。死んだあと体を見ると、脇や腰の下に毛がついていた。オオサキに憑かれたため死んだとのことである。


......................................................................................... Tochigi 栃木県
茂木町 Motegi

. Yooka sama 八日様 Yoka Sama, the Honorable Day Eight. .

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粟野町 Awano

rokusan sama ロクサン様 Rokusan Sama
Pain in the shoulders, lower back or legs is often simply called "Rokusan".
People visit elders who perform rituals to get rid of Rokusan (rokusan sake ロクサン避け).
They also offer special kinds of Tofu bean curd to Rokusan or the Family Deity (ujigami sama 氏神様).


masudoofu マス豆腐 / 枡豆腐 Tofu in a wooden Masu cup.

. Rokusan 六三 伝説 legends about Rokusan, deity of illness .


......................................................................................... Tokushima 徳島県
一宇村 Ichiu

hotokesan 仏さん

12月の初巳の日はミノヒといって、仏のお正月であるという。この日はオハカサンに竹を組んで注連縄を張り、お供えをして草履も置いておく。家で身内が集まって会食し、夜の12時を過ぎてから墓地に向かい、麦藁を燃やした火で炙った餅や豆腐を食べる。仏さんは藁火の明かりで、人々の様子を見ているとされた。

in other parts of Japan
mi no hi ミの日,ミウマ,タツミ

旧12月はじめの巳の日に仏壇に豆腐や餅を供える。四国でも各地により多少相違はあるが、この日は死霊が訪れてくる日だと信じていた。


......................................................................................... Tokyo 東京都
南多摩郡 恩方村 Tama, Ongata

お灸をすえた時には、豆腐を食べると灸熱を吸い込まれないという。

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新島村 Niijima village on the island of Niijima

runin 流人,enoki 榎
豆腐を買いに行った流人が、豆腐を盗んだかどで捕らえられて、首を斬られた。死に際して流人は、自分が死んだ後、墓地から榎が生えるであろうが、それは自分が潔白だったと言う証だと言い残した。そして生えた榎が「なぞの榎」だと言い伝えられている。



......................................................................................... Yamagata 山形県
鶴岡市 Tsuruoka

imi 忌 absention, ritual purification

黒川村の王祇祭で豆腐を作るとき、産死の忌の人が来ると豆腐が固まらないとされている。


......................................................................................... Yamaguchi 山口県
福栄村 Fukue

inugami 犬神 Dog Deity
犬神に憑かれると、寿司の味がわからなくなる、豆腐が水になる、もち米を搗いても餅にならないなどのことが起き、妬んだ人のことを口走る、雪中を駆け出す、妊婦が鳥を殺す、などの行動をとる。

. Inugami 犬神 "Dog Deity" .

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Yokai Database - tofu - 49 entries (00)
- source : www.nichibun.ac.jp -

- reference -

. Tofu Kozo shared at PINTEREST .

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. - - - Join my Kappa friends on facebook ! - - - .

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. - yookai, yōkai 妖怪 Yokai monsters - .

. Minwa 民話 folktales / densetsu 伝説 Japanese Legends .

. Mingei 民芸 Regional Folk Art from Japan .



. Kappa densetsu 河童伝説, Kappa minwa 河童民話 - Legends - Introduction .

- #tofukozo #tofukozoyokai -
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